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Media Monitoring

Wednesday 17th October 2018


  • Page 2 - Staff costs bust budget at health. The Tasmanian Health Service’s staffing budget blew out by more than $138 million in the last financial year — and almost one-third of that was on contract staff. The THS annual report attributed about $42 million of the overspend to locums, about $10 million to the accrual of leave expenditure and more than $1 million to termination payouts.

    Page 2 - Migraines a $35b pain. Migraines are becoming a headache for the economy, with a report putting their cost at $35 billion a year.

    Page 5 - $11m mental health promise. The Government has pledged to open an $11 million, 12-bed facility in New Town within two years for people living with subacute mental illness. Health Minister Michael Ferguson announced the St John’s Park development yesterday while talking up his expansion of the hospitals in the home program to include people with mental ill-health.

    Page 9 - Dementia from birth. Dementia sufferers may have been destined to suffer the disease from birth with new research showing the memory-destroying condition originates from mutations – spelling mistakes – as the brain cells form.

    Page 20 - Teamwork ends and patients lose. Tasmania’s main public hospital stopped an agreement with Calvary, bringing a halt to co-operation, writes Kwang Chien Yee I read with interest that the Health Minister is quick to blame staff shortage at private hospitals for the closure of medical beds.

    Page 21 - Rethinking how we deliver health services. Demand triggers changes aimed at easing pressure, says Michael Ferguson. It is no secret that demand for acute health services in every state has been increasing. 


    Page 12 - Emergency department pressures. Less than 65 per cent of emergency department presentations at Launceston General Hospital are seen within the recommended time frame, according to the latest Tasmanian Health Service annual report.

    Page 11 - Hospital program grows. The government will expand the Hospital in the Home program to include mental health patients by early next year, but it will be confined to Southern Tasmania. Health Minister Michael Ferguson made the announcement on the 12-bed program, which would begin within six months.


    Page 5 - Hospital in the Home program to be expanded next year. The government will expand the Hospital in the Home program to include mental health patients by early next year but it will be confined to southern Tasmania. 

Friday 12th October 2018


  • Page 18 - Hickey calls for rethink on failing systems, saying time has come for action.  Liberal MP Sue Hickey has called for a radical rethink of the state’s health, child protection, transport and housing problems, saying the culture of waste and blame needs to end. ONLINE

    Page 6 - Pressures on stressed Royal ease. The Opposition has warned that the Royal Hobart Hospital is still operating beyond its capacity after the Tasmanian Health Service stepped down its escalation point to three out of a possible four. ONLINE

    Page 16 - Re-invest in health, now. Premier Will Hodgman was right when he conceded — in a prepared speech on Sunday — that Tasmania’s health system is “far from good enough”. And while his concession was made in the context of his assurance that he was committed to reforming a health system that had been “disconnected and dysfunctional” under Labor, the core truth remains: Tasmania’s hospitals are seriously struggling.  Unions and the RHH staff association on Wednesday said the hospital was the worst it had been all year with issues of ramping, bed block and staff stress. ONLINE
     
    Page 18 - Put politics second, people first. Fixing the state’s healthcare woes would be easier if partisan politics were set aside. The political argy-bargy over the big issues facing our state needs to end
    — so we can fix them, says Sue Hickey. I recently listened to a speech delivered by Dr John Davis, Tasmanian President of the AMA, which focused on how he would like to see the health system in 2033. Whilst obviously idealistic, it described a system that would be functioning well and within budget to the benefit of all Tasmanians. His vision was that the broken parts would be fixed by sensible conversations between all the elements that govern the system.  ONLINE
     

    Page 3 - Private records could be exposed: GP. Tasmanians have until Monday to opt-out of the updated My Health Record service as doctors continue to express concerns over protections of sensitive medical information. ONLINE

    Page 13 - Hodgman says our hospitals are safe. Premier Will Hodgman has rejected suggestions Tasmania’s hospitals are unsafe. Health department secretary Michael Pervan also has moved to allay fears arising from a report which showed more than 80 Tasmanians a year died prematurely because of bed block in hospital emergency departments.


    Page 10 - Hospitals safe: Hodgman. Premier Will Hodgman has rejected suggestions Tasmania’s hospitals are unsafe. Health department secretary Michael Pervan also has moved to allay fears arising from a report which showed more than 80 Tasmanians a year died prematurely because of bed block in hospital emergency departments. ONLINE

    Page 10 - Private records could be exposed: GP. Tasmanians have until Monday to opt-out of the updated My Health Record service as doctors continue to express concerns over protections of sensitive medical information. ONLINE

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