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Media Monitoring

Thursday 25th October 2018


  • Page 4 - All still hush-hush in clinic countdown. The Health Department says Tasmanians will have access to low-cost surgical abortions within weeks but has not released the name or location of the new private provider. Department secretary Michael Pervan said in a statement yesterday that the Government would pay travel and accommodation costs for the unnamed provider to provide fortnightly clinics.

    Page 4 - Unions vow to up the ante. Thousands join day of action. Public sector unions have pledged a campaign of escalating industrial action after thousands turned out for rallies around the state in support of wage rises. About 3000 workers attended a rally on Hobart’s Parliament Lawns yesterday, with smaller gatherings in Launceston, St Helens and Burnie.

    Page 4 - Bits of plastic officially on the human menu. Bits of plastic have been detected in the faeces of people in Europe, Russia and Japan, according to research claiming to show for the first time the widespread presence of plastics in the human food chain. All eight volunteers in a small pilot study were found to have passed several types of plastic. The scientists speculated that the specks — as small as 50 micrometres — were ingested via seafood, food wrapping, dust or plastic bottles.

    Page - Nauru kids in need of urgent care. A confidential list based on medical assessments of 52 refugee children on Nauru reveals one in four has attempted suicide or expressed suicidal thoughts. One infant is not responding to sound or sight and may have a brain tumour requiring urgent medial assessment, another has blood in their urine and another cannot walk normally, according to doctors.

    Page 13 - First insight into how insulin really works. Australian researchers have taken a significant step towards the development of faster-acting and longer-lasting diabetes treatments, by creating the first 3D image of how insulin interacts with the body.

    Page 17 - Call on state to shift health aim. A former federal health department officer says it is irrelevant how much Tasmania spends on its health system if patients are not happy with their treatment. Grattan Institute health policy director Stephen Duckett yesterday told a Legislative Council committee examining the state’s acute health services that Tasmania was spending more per patient than hospitals interstate.

    Page 23 - No end in sight as we slide from bad to worse. Tasmania needs 350 hospital beds now just to get back to the unsatisfactory levels of seven years ago, says Martyn Goddard. The State Government is in serious trouble on health. Though the next election is 3½ years away — assuming the Government lasts that long — the political pressure has escalated from the painful to the excruciating.


    Page 5 - Health forums hit NW. Ferguson tackles Coaster queries. Access to general practitioners, the pressure on emergency departments and preventative healthcare were among the hot topics discussed at a series of health forums held on the North-West Coast on Wednesday night. 

    ONLINE - Michelle O’Byrne says abortions should be available in public hospitals. As more than 75 Tasmanian women have had abortions in Melbourne this year labor has renewed calls for terminations to be done in the state’s public hospital. 


    NIL

Monday 22nd October 2018


  • Page 6 - Wound glue to the test. A revolutionary “wound glue” that could save lives on the battlefield, revolutionise surgery and help reduce scarring is ready to enter human clinical trials. The Australian invention could seal catastrophic injuries and stop bleeding in just 60 seconds and help wounds heal in half the normal time. It works in conjunction with a special UV light.

    Page 14 - Dickensian begging ban reveals cracks in veneer of civilisation. Government and middle class, but not poor people, can ask for money, says Greg Barns. Last week we saw a proposal to abolish a Dickensian law which makes it a criminal offence to beg, rebuffed in the Parliament. Presumably this was because some conservative MPs blame those who beg for their plight, or who like the idea of the police state being perpetuated, or who could not being themselves to support a decent and much-needed reform because it was proposed by the Greens. 


    Page 2 - GPs share knowledge. Rural general practitioner supervisors from across Tasmania gathered at Barnbougle over Sunday and Monday for a two-day workshop. The doctors have all volunteered to be supervisors to registrars training to become specialist GPs, and have congregated in the North-East to share their skills, knowledge and experience. 

    Page 5 - Tasmania's health system will be the topic of conversation during a series of public forums planned throughout the state this week. Hosted by Health Minister Michael Ferguson, the forums will start in Hobart on Monday and continue in Launceston on Tuesday and Burnie and Devonport on Wednesday. Australian Medical Association Tasmania branch president John Davis said every Tasmanian should take advantage of the opportunity to have their voice heard. 

    Page 13 - Chance for health feedback. Tasmanians will be given the chance to share feedback on the state’s health system in a series of forums taking place this week. Health Minister Michael Ferguson will be front and centre at the forums, giving communities the chance to take their opinions straight to the top. There will be four forums; Hobart on October 22 from 5pm to 7pm at Hotel Grand Chancellor, Launceston on October 23 from 6pm to 7.30pm at The Tramsheds Function Centre, Burnie on October 24 from 5pm to 6.30pm at Burnie Arts and Function Centre and Devonport on October 24 from 7.30pm to 9pm at Paranaple Convention Centre. “We all know at the moment that our state’s health system is under stress,” he said.


    Page 5 - Health forums to hit the road. Tasmania. Tasmania's health system will be the topic of conversation during a series of public forums planned throughout the state this week. Hosted by Health Minister Michael Ferguson, the forums will start in Hobart on Monday and continue in Launceston on Tuesday and Burnie and Devonport on Wednesday. Australian Medical Association Tasmania branch president John Davis said every Tasmanian should take advantage of the opportunity to have their voice heard. “We all know at the moment that our state’s health system is under stress,” he said. “It is very important that the minister, the government and the opposition understand what the public expects from its health system. “This is a really significant opportunity to show how important Tasmanians take their health.”

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