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Monday 12th November 2018


  • Page 3 - Mental health malaise. A damning independent report into Tasmania’s mental health services has revealed it is grossly underfunded and needs an extra $30 million a year just to deliver a national standard of care. But Health Minister Michael Ferguson said the Government was meeting its obligations to mental health.

    Page 5 - Painful wait as health system fails. The long wait for a wheelchair in Southern Tasmania is leaving some people with disabilities in pain, advocates say. The Tasmanian Health Service has citied the transition to the National Disability Insurance Scheme and difficulty recruiting highly specialised staff as reasons for the delays. Three-year-old Alexis Downie, who has spinal muscular atrophy, is one of those facing a long wait for a motorised wheelchair.

    Page 15 - Treatment is better but system worse. We've got much better at talking about mental health but much worse at dealing with it. Some of the stigma has been removed. More and more, we regard mental illness as a health condition, not as a strange and dangerous oddity. We no longer divide the world into loonies, cripples and normals. We’re all just people.


    Page 7 - Mental health bleak state. Health Minister Michael Ferguson has rejected a report which paints a bleak picture of mental health services in Tasmania. In his report, based on data from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, analyst Martyn Goddard said Tasmania had a higher prevalence of mental health risk than other states and needed more state government funding.

    ONLINE - Mental Health Council Tasmania calls for a conversation beyond 'just beds'. Claims that Tasmania has a greater shortage of psychiatrists than any other state are unquestionable, according to Mental Health Council of Tasmania chief executive Connie Digolis.


    Page 2 - Wynyard to get three paramedics. Wynyard will have three extra paramedics within the next seven months, Health Minister Michael Ferguson has announced. “Recruitment for the positions will start this week,” he said. “It’s part of the government’s investment in rural and regional ambulance services. “Along with a branch station officer in each region - North-West, North and South, the three new Wynyard paramedics will be the first of 42 to be employed over six years in rural and regional areas across the state.

    Page 7 - Mental health bleak state. Health Minister Michael Ferguson has rejected a report which paints a bleak picture of mental health services in Tasmania. In his report, based on data from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, analyst Martyn Goddard said Tasmania had a higher prevalence of mental health risk than other states and needed more state government funding.

Thursday 8th November 2018


  • Page 1 - Shot in the arm. Jab program’s success rate. This winter’s free meningococcal vaccine program is officially the most successful such scheme in the state’s history, with almost 90,000 young Tasmanians being protected. Health Department figures reveal 82 per cent of under-20s in the area where most cases of the disease came from this year — Hobart’s northern suburbs — are now protected against four of the five meningococcal strains. The highest rate of vaccinations was among mid-teens, with 94 per cent of 15 year-olds now covered. But the rate drops away dramatically after to just 31 per cent coverage of 20 year-olds. 

    Page 1 - Clinic access still delayed. The Premier says he still can’t say when women will again have access to low-cost abortions in Tasmania. Despite government promises a new service would be operating by the end of October, it is not — and Premier Will Hodgman said a deal had been struck with a new operator, but it was now up to them to open. 

    Page 6 - No positives’ in gun laws. Shooters dismiss firearms rules. Tasmania's Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Party has declared the state has never suffered a gun problem in a passionate submission to a state government inquiry into firearm laws.

    Page 8 - Insurance giant walks away from firefighter. A Tasmanian firefighter injured in the line of duty has sold his car and caravan to pay for ongoing treatment because Allianz insurance will no longer fork out the cash. Father-of-two Rob Boost was battling a wildfire in Tasmania’s South West National Park in early 2016 when he was struck on the head by a large falling tree branch.

    Page 9 - Nurses pushed to the limit. Emil Shepard knows how hard it is to do a job when your workplace is crumbling about you. Reversing hard into a tree as she headed home from a double shift at Launceston General Hospital was a wakeup call for nurse Emily Shepherd. Clocking on at 1.30pm, she had worked until 7am the next day.


    Page 4 - Relevance of firearms agreement slammed. Party pans firearms agreement and calls it a 'waste of money'. The Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Party has taken aim at the National Firearms Agreement, labelling it a waste of money which has not produced tangible outcomes.

    Page 5 - Abortion policy under attack. Tasmanian lawyer Susan Fahey has launched a scathing attack on the government for “re-stigmatising” abortion and penalising women who live outside Hobart. The blast comes as Premier Will Hodgman conceded that a new low cost abortion provider, promised to be up and running in October, had not yet found suitable premises.


    Page 4 - Relevance of firearms agreement slammed. Party pans firearms agreement and calls it a 'waste of money'. The Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Party has taken aim at the National Firearms Agreement, labelling it a waste of money which has not produced tangible outcomes.

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