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Media Monitoring

Thursday 15th November 2018


  • Page 1 - Royal slips in rankings. The Royal Hobart Hospital has bucked a national trend of increasing efficiency and falling costs, new figures suggest. The figures from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare reveal the cost of care at the Royal increased by 7 per cent over the two years to 2015.Its ranking fell from 16th to 23rd in a comparison of the nation’s 31 major public hospitals. The average cost of delivering care decreased by 1 per cent over the period.

    Page 10 - Royal Hobart Hospital is spending more but delivering less as it falls in national efficiency rankings. The cost of care at the Royal Hobart Hospital increased by 7 per cent between 2012/13 and 2014/15, bucking a national trend of increased efficiency and falling costs, new figures show. 

    Page 15 - Health record backdown. Your dietitian, dentist, podiatrist or optometrist will be able to see if you are impotent, have a sexually transmitted disease or a drug addiction unless you set access controls on the controversial online My Health Record. The major new privacy concerns have emerged after the Government was yesterday forced into an embarrassing backdown and had to delay the rollout of the record for a further 10 weeks. People trying to access the My Health Record hotline and computer portal yesterday experienced major delays as there was a rush to opt out before the system was due to roll out tomorrow.

    Page 19 - Choose to put skin cancer in the shade.Too few people use hats and shelter to prevent sun damage. Although Tasmania’s weather is ever changeable, we are now into the long season when being SunSmart needs to be our absolute priority.

    ONLINE - Southern Cross Care’s Yaraandoo facility in Somerset on notice after aged care team review finds flaws. Another Tasmanian aged-care facility has failed to meet industry standards and has been ordered to hire an administrator and not accept any new residents. 

    ONLINE - Royal Hobart Hospital closes 10 beds after gastro outbreak. The Tasmanian Health Service has revealed the Royal Hobart Hospital lost 10 beds to a gastro outbreak this week. RHH executive clinical director Craig Quarmby said 10 beds were shut for about a day because of the outbreak. 

    ONLINE - Not Ovary-Acting group plans protest on Tasmanian abortion access. Abortion access activists are planning to present a chain of signed paper uteruses to the Tasmanian Government on Saturday.


    Page 7 - Research window of opportunity.  New research into insulin resistance aims to unlock a window of opportunity in preventing type 2 diabetes. University of Tasmania biomedical science lecturer Dr Stephen Myers’ latest study explores the zinc activation of the enzymes responsible for insulin signalling. 

    Page 16 - Health record opt-out extended. Australians will have until the end of January to opt out of the controversial My Health Record system after the federal government caved to pressure. One day ahead of the deadline, Health Minister Greg Hunt on Wednesday announced the opt-out period would be extended until January 31 next year. 

    Page 16 - Euthanasia inquiry. Queenslanders will have the chance to make known their views on making euthanasia legal, with a year-long consultation on the issue to be held. Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk has called for a parliamentary inquiry into voluntary assisted dying laws, saying the emotive issue requires time for everyone to have their say. The parliamentary committee should look to Victoria for guidance, she said on Wednesday.

    Page 20 - Investment ongoing, more work to be done.  Tarran Woods of Somerset, sits with Minister for Health Michael Ferguson at the City Mission's Serenity House at Sulphur Creek. This is all about helping Tasmanians in times of need and making communities safer. The Hodgman Liberal Government is delivering a strong health plan that is all about providing the right care, in the right place, at the right time to make Tasmanians’ lives better. This means more funding for better services, more frontline staff, modern buildings and reversing Labor’s health cuts. 


    Page 5 - Yaraandoo sanctioned. Staff at Somerset’s Yaraandoo Aged Care Facility have been devastated by news that the facility can’t take in new residents after failing to meet quality standards.

    Page 9 - GPs not as trusted by young people. Young people are much less likely to be satisfied with their general practitioner than older people. The latest data on patient experiences from the Australia Bureau of Statistics shows that just over two thirds of young people aged 15 to 34 years felt their GP listened to them carefully. 

    Page 10 - Asbestos death rates rise. Tasmania has the lowest rate of asbestos-related cancer deaths in the country, but cases nationally are on the rise, according to a recent report. The Australia Institute of Health and Welfare report says between 1982 and 2017, cases have been steadily increasing. 

    Page 13 - Health record opt-out extended. Australians will have until the end of January to opt out of the controversial My Health Record system after the federal government caved to pressure.

    Page 16 - Boosting residential rehabilitation services. The Hodgman Liberal Government is delivering a strong health plan that is all about providing the right care, in the right place, at the right time to make Tasmanians’ lives better. This means more funding for better services, more frontline staff, modern buildings and reversing previous health cuts. This week, we announced 31 additional alcohol and drug rehabilitation beds across the state – a boost of 40 per cent, and the biggest boost in treatment services the state has ever funded. The new beds will be available in each region, including five at Serenity House at Sulphur Creek, which I visited this week with my colleague Leonie Hiscutt MLC on Tuesday. This will take the number of community-based residential rehab beds to more than 100, including 17 on the Coast.

Wednesday 14th November 2018


  • Page 4 - Privacy fears dog health record. Millions of Australians will have online records of their complete health histories created for them starting from tomorrow without extra privacy and security protections unless the Senate signs off on the measures today. The Opposition is to make a last-ditch attempt today to force the Government to extend the opt-out period on My Health Records for 12 months before it ends tomorrow amid online privacy fears. The move would give parliament time to introduce the extra security and privacy measures. But if the Senate does not pass the legislation, the opt-out period will end without the extra protections. That includes amendments to prevent law enforcement agencies from accessing any My Health Records without a warrant and to allow Australians to delete part or all of their record permanently. About 1.147 million Australians have opted out of the online health system so far.

    Page 12 - $6m for more rehab beds in state. The State Government has announced funding for 31 more beds for alcohol and drug rehabilitation across the state. Health Minister Michael Ferguson said $6 million would be spent over three years to take the total number of community-based residential rehab beds to more than 100. The funding will pay for a mix of short and longer-stay residential rehab and day programs, after-care and ambulatory, and nonmedical withdrawal management services around the state. The Launceston City Mission will increase long-term residential beds at its Missiondale Recovery Centre in the North by 10, and at Serenity House in the North-West by five to provide a flexible mix of non-medicated supervised inpatient withdrawal management beds and short-stay residential rehab of four to six weeks. The Salvation Army will provide 16 more beds at its Bridge Program South — 15 residential rehab beds for four-10-week stays and one withdrawal management bed.

    Page 19 - Connecting the dots on healthy travel options. Building connected corridors makes it easy to walk or bike, says Graeme Lynch. Transport and movement networks are a hot topic in Hobart, and rightly so.

    ONLINE - southern Cross Care’s Yaraandoo facility in Somerset on notice after aged care team review finds flaws. Another Tasmanian aged-care facility has failed to meet industry standards and has been told to not accept any new residents and to implement training programs. 


    Page 4 - Funds for new rehab beds. City Mission will be able to help more Tasmanians kick their drug and alcohol addictions thanks to a $6 million spend by the state government. Ten additional long-term residential beds will open at City Mission’s Missiondale Recovery Centre at Evandale as part of a three-year funding deal. 

    Page 10 - Nurses rally over concerns. Unions will take their concerns to the street with a community rally planned for Launceston on Saturday. Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation Tasmania members will walk from Launceston General Hospital to Civic Square, in an effort to raise awareness for ongoing industrial action. 


    Page 2 - Spend for serenity. Coasters struggling with drug and alcohol addiction will have more opportunities to get help following an expansion of Serenity House. The Sulphur Creek facility was one beneficiary of a $6 million government package to increase residential rehabilitation beds. City Mission chief executive Stephen Brown said the funding was “a big step forward” but time would tell whether it was enough to meet the needs of Tasmania. Serenity House will be able to help more Coasters kick their drug and alcohol addictions thanks to a $6 million spend by the state government.

    Page 6 - Vacancies not known. The Tasmanian health department has not been able to confirm how many vacant paramedic jobs exist in Ambulance Tasmania after three new positions were announced for Wynyard. The Advocate requested information on the number of paramedic positions Ambulance Tasmania had been funded for in each region and how many of these jobs remained vacant at this point in time. After more than 30 hours, the Department of Health was not able to provide a response. Health Minister Michael Ferguson was asked about the number of vacant jobs at a press conference at Sulphur Creek on Tuesday but could not confirm an answer. 

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