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Nano-device helps early disease detection

A research team at James Cook University has reported developing a new ultra-sensitive diagnostic tool that they say will enable early diagnosis of life-threatening diseases such as cancer and control of pandemics such as influenza and dengue.

02 May 2010

A research team at James Cook University has reported developing a new ultra-sensitive diagnostic tool that they say will enable early diagnosis of life-threatening diseases such as cancer and control of pandemics such as influenza and dengue.

The new technology is called TT-lock-based rt-IPCR assay and it was developed with the help of funding by the NHMRC. 

Dr Patrick Schaeffer, head of Supramolecular and Synthetic Biology Group at JCU’s School of Pharmacy and Molecular Sciences, said that the tool was based on the use of a new nano-device consisting of an anti-target protein linked to a barcode DNA sequence capable of detecting minute amounts of disease markers in serum.

The team has described its research in the journal Molecular BioSystems.


Published: 02 May 2010