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Junior doctors – does your hospital support your training?

Public hospitals are fundamental to educating and training doctors and the AMA wants to know if they are striking the right balance between caring for patients and training the next generation of doctors. Adequate medical training requires proper facilities, adequate clinical supervision, appropriate channels for feedback and protected time for education and training.

17 Jun 2012

Public hospitals are fundamental to educating and training doctors and the AMA wants to know if they are striking the right balance between caring for patients and training the next generation of doctors.

Adequate medical training requires proper facilities, adequate clinical supervision, appropriate channels for feedback and protected time for education and training.

Each is crucial to high quality clinical training, and the pressure on the hospital system to provide them is only going to intensify as the number of medical students and graduates grows.

The AMA is conducting a confidential, online survey of junior doctors in each State and Territory on the quality of the training, education and supervision that they are receiving in their training hospital.

This is the second survey of its type. The first, conducted in 2009, attracted more than 900 responses and delivered a mixed report card on the quality of the public hospital training environment.

It was vital in highlighting the need for more resources to ensure that the quality of medical training in our public hospitals was maintained and improved.

AMA Council of Doctors in Training Chair, Dr Will Milford, says it was critical that junior doctors are appropriately supported and supervised during their formative training years, and that the breadth of their experiences properly prepares them for independent medical practice.

“Access to a high-quality training environment and educational resources is an issue of great importance to junior doctors.  It is vital that they receive a proper learning experience in their training hospital,” he said. 

Dr Milford said the 2012 survey would assess what changes have taken place since 2009, and provide a measure of the commitment of hospitals to maintaining the high quality of care that Australians expect from their doctors.

Dr Milford said that with the number of medical graduates rising even further in the coming years, there will be growing demand for training posts in hospitals.

“Health Workforce Australia recently released its National Training Plan Report, Health Workforce 2025 (HW2025), highlighting that the health system as it currently stands will not cope with the demand for training places from 2016 onwards,” he said.

“Governments need to address this, otherwise thousands of junior doctors will not be able to achieve specialist qualification, and the community will not realise the full benefit of its investment in increased medical school places.”

The AMA will use the results of the survey to lobby hospitals and governments to commit the resources necessary to ensure that junior doctors are working in an environment that supports a high-quality training experience.

The anonymous, five minute survey – which runs from 18 June to 20 July – is open to AMA members and non-members, and all junior doctors are encouraged to participate. 

If you would like to participate, please go to http://ama.com.au/dit-training-survey-2012

 

 


Published: 17 Jun 2012