The Australian Medical Association Limited and state AMA entities comply with the Privacy Act 1988. Please refer to the AMA Privacy Policy to understand our commitment to you and information on how we store and protect your data.

×

Search

×

Grants on offer to improve clinical supervision

Hopes for action to tackle the shortage of training places for medical graduates have been bolstered by Health Workforce Australia’s decision to offer almost $400,000 for research into improving the capacity and quality of clinical supervision programs. The Australian Medical Association has welcomed Health Workforce Australia’s move to offer 15 National Clinical Supervision Fellowships, worth up to $25,000 each, as a small but encouraging step towards addressing the mounting shortage of pre-vocational and specialist training places for medical graduates.

17 Jun 2012

Hopes for action to tackle the shortage of training places for medical graduates have been bolstered by Health Workforce Australia’s decision to offer almost $400,000 for research into improving the capacity and quality of clinical supervision programs.

The Australian Medical Association has welcomed Health Workforce Australia’s move to offer 15 National Clinical Supervision Fellowships, worth up to $25,000 each, as a small but encouraging step towards addressing the mounting shortage of pre-vocational and specialist training places for medical graduates.

A report by Health Workforce Australia (HWA) released in late April warned there could be national shortage of almost 3000 doctors by the middle of the next decade unless there is a major boost to training places for medical graduates. 

According to the Health Workforce 2025 report, in 2016 there will be 3867 doctors who require a first year advanced specialist-training place, whereas the most recent data shows that there are currently only 2817 positions available.

Even factoring some growth in these places, Health Workforce 2025 is still projecting a shortage of 451 training positions.

Under the initiative, fellowships worth up to $25,000 each will be awarded to those involved in providing or researching clinical supervision.

The funding will be provided for projects that help increase opportunities for clinical supervision, improve its quality or develop new models for oversight and training.

Health Workforce Australia is particularly interested in research proposals with an “inter-professional” focus, though those specific to particular disciplines will also be considered

Chair of the AMA’s Doctors in Training Group, Will Milford, said any research that could lead to more efficient use of limited clinical supervision resources, or may expand the range of settings in which it is provided, was welcome.

“We would certainly encourage giving greater recognition and support to the supervision and training roles undertaken by clinicians” Dr Milford said.

But he warned much more needed to be done.

“There needs to be a concerted and coordinated effort by all those involved,” he said, including governments, medical colleges, and hospitals. “ this is not something that has fallen to any one body, and as a result there has not been a lot of focus on it,” he said. “If a body like HWA or the MTRP (Medical Training Review Panel) became involved at a co-ordination level, then that would be welcomed.”

More information is available at the HWA website (click here).

Fellowship applications close on 31 July this year.

AR


Published: 17 Jun 2012