The Australian Medical Association Limited and state AMA entities comply with the Privacy Act 1988. Please refer to the AMA Privacy Policy to understand our commitment to you and information on how we store and protect your data.

×

Search

×
03 May 2019

 

The Australian Greens have unveiled a mental health policy aimed at ensuring mental health services become universally and accessible to all Australians.

The six-point plan includes making services effective, transparent and accessible; funding prevention and early intervention through $500 million in funding over the next decade; building a fully funded and adequately staffed NDIS and provide an additional $450 million for community psychosocial services;  building mentally healthy workplaces through providing $604 million over the decade for mental health workplace interventions in smaller businesses and $50 million per year for three years for mental health interventions in larger businesses and expanding the existing Individual Placement and Support trial; increasing the numbers of peer workers by providing $166 million to fund a two-year national peer workforce trial with 1,000 places; and reducing mental health stigma through an anti-stigma campaign involving those with lived experience.

“Mental illness is one of the biggest challenges of the 21st century and access to treatments should be universal. People in our community should be able to get easy access to treatments in the same way they would for a broken leg or the flu,” Greens spokesperson on mental health Senator Rachel Siewert said.

“There has been under-investment in the mental health sector by successive governments, which has resulted in the system failing to meet the needs of thousands of Australians…

“All health services should be evaluated and funding should be provided in a transparent way, which we are not seeing at the moment. It’s not just a matter of throwing money at an issue, funding needs to be properly targeted and evaluated so there is transparency around who is getting funding and whether outcomes are being achieved.”

CHRIS JOHNSON


Published: 03 May 2019